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Rhode Island Climate Change: EC3 Releases Preliminary Report

Thursday, May 08, 2014

 

Governor Lincoln Chafee, Department of Environmental Management Director Janet Coit, and Bristol Town Administrator Antonio A. Teixeira announced the preliminary report by the Rhode Island Executive Climate Change Council (EC3) today at Bristol Beach.

Narragansett Bay

Chafee established EC3 in February to advise legislators in Rhode Island on how to best deal with the effects of climate change. The EC3 includes representatives of several state agencies, including the Department of Administration; Department of Transportation, Department of Health, Emergency Management Agency, Office of Energy Resources; Division of Planning, Rhode Island Commerce Corporation and Coastal Resources Management Council.

Findings

The report finds that cities and towns are further along than the state in terms of dealing with rising water levels and extreme conditions. The report calls for cooperation between the private sector and the state’s academic institutions, while also endorsing many of the legislative proposals that have been presented to the General Assembly during the current session.

“We are currently experiencing more frequent and intense storms, as well as higher tides and storm surges, creating major challenges for our cities and towns, businesses and residents,” Chafee said. “It is important to use our resources and talents in all sectors to develop real solutions so that our communities and our economy can weather these storms, and ultimately come out stronger.”

The entire report is available online at: http://www.planning.ri.gov/statewideplanning/climate/resources.php.

Public comments on the report may be submitted no later than 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, May 20, to jan.reitsma@governor.ri.gov
 

 

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