Welcome! Login | Register
 

The Scoop: RI GOP Blasts Raimondo/Reed Commercial, Lynch Called for Pierson Resignation, and More—Welcome back to The Scoop, the 4 p.m.…

Child Death Resulting from Staphylococcus Aureus Sepsis Associated with Enteroviral Infection—The Rhode Island Department of Health has confirmed…

Providence Ranked Worst City for People with Disabilities—Providence was ranked the worst city for people…

NEW: Three RI Schools Named National Blue Ribbon Schools—The U.S. Department of Education has honored Barrington…

NEW: RI Republican Party Chairman Files Board of Elections Complaint Alleging Finance Violation—Mark Smiley, the Rhode Island Republican Party Chairman,…

The Scoop: Fung’s Plan to Reform Taxes, Gorbea Adds to Campaign Team, and More—Welcome back to The Scoop, the 4 p.m.…

It’s All About Education: Chronic Absenteeism’s Effect on Learning—One of the biggest challenges in our schools…

Chef Walter’s Flavors + Knowledge: Braised Chicken Agrodolce with Dried Plums—Agrodolce (pronounced "agro-dolchay") is an Italian term for…

Sixth Annual Runway for a Cure Set For October 21—The Lupus Foundation of New England and a…

Steven Latimer 5k Run/Walk to Kick Off October 8—The third-annual Steven Latimer 5K Families Against Violence…

 
 

Butler Hospital: Exercise May Improve Parkinson’s Symptoms

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

 

A recent research study found that people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) showed marked reductions in physical symptoms and increased emotional well being after participating in a 20-week exercise program. The plan included walking, backward walking, and ball-bouncing which increased strength, flexibility, and coordination, while weight training of the legs improved walking ability and balance. The best exercises, however, are those that decrease the risk of a PD sufferer falling: water aerobics, yoga, tai chi, swimming, and riding a stationary bike.

Local Doctor on the Forefront of Research

Dr. Joseph H. Friedman, chief of the Movement Disorders Program at Butler Hospital and an international authority in PD, said that mood-associated symptoms of the disease, including depression, lethargy and exhaustion, “can actually be more debilitating to the patients and family members than the movement-related aspects of the disorder.” This month, Butler Hospital has launched a multimedia Ask the Experts campaign, where people can ask any questions they have about PD and other movement disorders by submitting questions on Butler’s Facebook page or anonymously through the hospital’s website, butler.org. All questions will be answered by Dr. Friedman and posted on the sites throughout November.

The hospital will also be featuring a series of brief educational videos that will be available on the sites and on the hospital's YouTube channel, which will cover topics from how Parkinson’s is diagnosed to innovative new treatments such as Deep Brain Stimulation, and how patients and family members can better learn to manage their lives with the disease. A free public lecture presented by Dr. Friedman, entitled Learning How to Get the Most Out of Life With Parkinson’s, will take place on November 20 from 10-11:30am at the Ray Conference Center on the Butler Campus. Following the program, the public is invited to attend an open house and tour of the new Movement Disorders Program at Butler Hospital. Register via e-mail: info@butler.org or call 455-6265.

 

 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.