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College Admissions: The Hardest Colleges To Get Into In 2013

Saturday, June 01, 2013

 

Stanford University has overtaken Harvard as the hardest college to get into in 2013, with a record-breaking low acceptance rate of 5.7%.

Statistics for the Class of 2017 are staring to roll out now that regular decision season has come to a close, and the numbers are daunting at the big name colleges. 7 of the 8 Ivy League universities reported a lower acceptance rate (only Dartmouth saw a slight increase). Harvard reported the lowest Ivy acceptance rate at 5.79%, followed by Yale at 6.72%, Columbia at 6.89%, Princeton at 7.29% and Brown at

9.16%. In the double digits, Dartmouth offered 10.05% of applicants a spot in the freshman class, followed by UPENN - 12.10% and Cornell - 15.15%. Outside the Ivy League, Stanford topped Harvard with an all-time low acceptance rate of just 5.7% and MIT took just 8.2% of applicants.

City Schools-Big Winners

Meanwhile, applications surged at a number of colleges, particularly those in cities. Boston University saw almost a 20% increase in applications. Case Western in Cleveland received 25% more applications. And at UCLA, U. Chicago and NYU, applications increased approximately 10%. Even colleges in smaller cities, like Clark in Worcester, saw a 28% jump. However, one rural college rocked the numbers with a 42% increase in applicants: tiny Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY.

Scandals Can Hurt

Who took a tumble? Amherst College saw more than a 7% decrease in apps following a rape scandal that shook the campus and national media. And for unknown reasons, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute applications dropped more than 10%.

All Colleges Are NOT Uber Competitive

Depressed by the numbers? Don’t be. There are more than 2,000 four year colleges in the U.S., and only 300-400 of those are selective. The reality is that most colleges in the U.S. take more than 75% of applicants, and less than 10% of Fortune 500 CEO’s went to an Ivy League college. The most important factor in selecting a school should not be selectivity, but rather how well the institution matches your learning style, academic goals, career interests, personality and budget.

Cristiana Quinn, M.Ed. is the founder of College Admission Advisors, LLC which provides strategic, college counseling and athletic recruiting services for students. www.collegeadvisorsonline.com.

 

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Comments:

One of the biggest hoax's in our society is the entire college entrance dance. The next biggest hoax is the cost to attend these institutions of higher learning. Regrettably, despite much grumbling from sticker shocked parents, they continue to send Johnny & Joannie to these over priced "businesses". And what is the "profile" used to accept college applicants; it's really anyone's guess and varies widely depending on the school. All in all, despite the best preparation, the college search is a draining experience for both student and parents. It really shouldn't be this hard!

Comment #1 by Harold Stassen on 2013 04 09

It may be true that only 10% of Fortune 500 companies are headed by Ivy Leaguers, but that assumes that that is still an accurate and relevant measurement of influence. In 21st century America's information economy, power has shifted from manufacturing to services. I bet the rate of Ivy league dominance in government, the judiciary, entertainment, journalism and wall street is much higher than 10%.

Comment #2 by Kevin McCarthy on 2013 04 10

What no one will admit: not asking for financial aid will increase your chance of acceptance at any college.

Comment #3 by josephine sutton on 2013 06 02




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