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Russell Moore: Should City Workers Be Millionaires?

Monday, December 09, 2013

 

Can your job really be considered public service if you can become a millionaire doing it?

That was my first thought when I read Stephen Beale’s report last week, which detailed the top 40 paid employees in the City of Providence this year. The top paid worker is a firefighter who earned $116,357 in overtime alone.

According to data from the census bureau, the median household income in Rhode Island from 2007-20011 was $55,975. This particular firefighter earned more than double in overtime what the average household in Rhode Island earns per year.

Millionaire on a Ladder

With a base pay of $68,762, this particular employee could live comfortably off his base pay—better than the median Rhode Island household—and bank the overtime. In less than 9 years, this individual would have earned more than $1 million pre-tax in overtime pay.

And what's more, this top paid city employee received a total compensation of $218,145 last year—a figure that includes taxpayer-funded contributions to his medical, dental, and retirement benefits.

That's just the top worker. In sum, the top 40 highest paid employees took home $6.3 million in compensation. That means it costs the city roughly $157,000, on average, for each of the 40 top paid workers.

Profit motive

I was criticized a few weeks ago for suggesting that small business owners, who risk everything to employ people, pay taxes to support the government, and yes, earn a profit, should be considered public servants too. A small businessman can't be a public servant because he hope to earn a profit, or something.

Yet at the same time, we're supposed to believe that a city worker who earns $157,000 without taking on any financial risk is a public servant. The service factor is unequivocally is why he or she wants the job.

If it's all about profit motive, it may be a more logical move to take a job with the government than to risk your money starting a business. Therefore, the current system just may be incentivizing people to do public service not for its own sake, but for financial security.

Its really not so easy to define what is and isn't public service after all.

Taking Care of Business, Working Overtime

According to Beale's analysis, there were 23 firefighters and three police officers who earned almost as much, if not more, in longevity, detail, and overtime, than they did in base pay.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't one of the main reasons we have unions is to prevent workers from laboring so many long hours away from their families and loved ones?

Paul Doughty, the city firefighter union president, and by all accounts an intelligent, decent guy, agreed. Doughty pointed out that the firefighters on the list had effectively been working two positions to make up for a staffing shortage in the department. He called the overtime pay excessive.

According to Beale's report, the city has added two new recruitment classes of firefighters that will undoubtedly lead to a lessening of the overtime costs.

The question remains, however, is what that will do to the city's benefits budget. In the short term, the new hires will relieve some pressure on the pension system thanks to their contributions, and that's a good thing. But the city will have to pay these workers health care costs and, eventually, their pensions.

Broken City Government

None of this should be considered a criticism of the people who work for the city and were paid these wages. On the contrary, despite a few bad apples here or there (as there are anywhere) the vast majority of our city and state employees are hard, devoted workers. The gentleman earning the overtime didn't set up the system--he's just following the rules. And firefighters are undoubtedly heroes who risk their lives on a daily basis to save others.

The larger point here is that the Providence city government is broken.

Providence Mayor Angel Taveras has had to raise taxes twice since he took office in 2011. When you’re paying a rank-and-file firefighter over $200,000 in a given year, its must be hard to look at the taxpayers and suggest that they’re not paying enough in taxes.

Also disconcerting in Beale's report was the fact that the city's CEO is the 152 highest paid city employee. Nope, that's not a typo. Nobody can say there isn’t something inherently wrong when a government’s CEO, in this case Mayor Angel Taveras, didn’t even crack the list of the 40 highest paid city workers.

The private sector compensation for CEO's compared to the average workers is ridiculous. The average CEO and a S&P 500 company earns more than 354 times what the average worker does. That’s insane.

No Comment from Mayor Taveras

But as crazy as that sounds, it sounds equally crazy that a big city mayor would make less than 152 of the people working for him. When asked for comment, the mayor, through a spokesman, declined. How's that for leadership?

Mike D'Amico, the mayor's Chief of Staff, Director of Administration, and all around top-dog over at city hall, earns $174,000 in base salary. It's understandable that the Mayor's top administrator should command a high salary. But President Barrack Obama's Chief of Staff earns $172,000. That means the White House Chief of Staff earns less than the Providence Mayor's.

Nothing to See Here

Dan Beardsley, who leads the state's League of Cities and Towns, argued in the article that all of the people working in the administrations of Rhode Island's cities and towns are not overpaid because many of them are taking on additional responsibilities. I can understand why Beardsley would make such a comment, as it's his job to defend the people who pay his own nice salary.

But Beardsley's grandstanding was nothing short of shameless. Allow me to clue Beardsley in on something--people in the private sector, which funds the government, have been taking on additional duties and working dual positions for about a decade now.

Beardsley says public sector workers are grossly underpaid compared to their counterparts in private sector. Where is the proof of this? He mentions tax collectors and assessors. I never knew the private sector employed tax collectors and tax assessors.

As Providence Goes...

If you think this particular story isn't important to you because you don't live in the capital city, think again. What makes this story so important for all Rhode Islanders is the fact that Providence is almost half-funded by state aid. So when the average Rhode Islander from Westerly to Woonsocket is paying his income and sales taxes--he's paying these salaries.

But change will only come when people demand it. As long as the median Rhode Island household, which earns about 56,000 per year, is happy with the current system, or feels hopeless to change the system, it will remain in place. And public service will remain a good way to earn a great salary with great benefits free of financial risk.

A native Rhode Islander, Russell J. Moore is a graduate of Providence College and St. Raphael Academy. He worked as a news reporter for 7 years (2004-2010), 5 of which with The Warwick Beacon, focusing on government. He continues to keep a close eye on the inner workings of Rhode Islands state and local governments.

 

Related Slideshow: City Employees with the Highest Salaries

How much does a top position in Rhode Island’s capital city fetch in pay and benefits? GoLocalProv has identified the 40 highest earners in the city (excluding school workers) by the amount of total compensation they receive. The data, which was provided by the city, breaks out pay in four categories: base pay, longevity, overtime, and details. City contributions towards three benefits are also shown: medical, dental, and retirement. In the below slides, the top 40 highest earning workers for fiscal year 2013 are listed from least to greatest.

Prev Next

#40 Alyssa B. Deandrade

Department: Police

Position: Police Lieutenant

Total Compensation: $146,690.77

Pay

Base: $77,210.61

Longevity: $7,393.16

Overtime: $22,337.05

Detail: $24,533.14

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $4,219.62

Dental: $421.72

Pension: $10,575.47

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#39 Arianne Lynch

Department: Mayor's Staff

Position: (Former) Deputy Chief Of Staff

Total Compensation: $147,159.76

Pay

Base: $127,507.25

Longevity: $0.00

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1,380.08

Pension: $5,737.83

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#38 Clarence A. Cunha

Department: Fire

Position: Acting Deputy Assistant Chief

Total Compensation: $147,372.06

Pay

Base: $91,807.36

Longevity: $7,949.52

Overtime: $18,839.30

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $12,686.83

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#37 Kristopher S. Wright

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $147,585.09

Pay

Base: $58,663.74

Longevity: $4,447.53

Overtime: $48,507.28

Detail: $11,848.81

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,028.67

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#36 Thomas M. Miller

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Rescue Lieutenant

Total Compensation: $147,951.99

Pay

Base: $64,547.59

Longevity: $6,476.44

Overtime: $51,832.96

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $9,005.94

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#35 Daniel Crowley

Department: Fire

Position: Deputy Assistant Fire Chief

Total Compensation: $148,230.56

Pay

Base: $93,692.88

Longevity: $9,855.21

Overtime: $17,904.62

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.6

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $12,943.51

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#34 Alan N. Lippacher

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Rescue Lieutenant

Total Compensation: $148,783.985

Pay

Base: $63,829.18

Longevity: $6,602.73

Overtime: $53,326.52

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,936.495

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#33 David A. Soscia

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Battalion Chief

Total Compensation: $149,017.14

Pay

Base: $86,012.90

Longevity: $7,577.69

Overtime: $27,426.18

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $11,911.31

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#32 Michael Krasnowiecki

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Captain

Total Compensation: $149,110.485

Pay

Base: $68,849.54

Longevity: $6,762.06

Overtime: $47,784.88

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $9,624.945

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#31 Thomas E. Crowley

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Captain

Total Compensation: $149,965.63

Pay

Base: $69,535.07

Longevity: $7,177.86

Overtime: $47,429.98

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $9,733.66

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#30 John P. Morgan

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $150,207.15

Pay

Base: $58,102.50

Longevity: $6,116.69

Overtime: $57,905.69

Detail: $3,847.12

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,146.09

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#29 Timothy S. Printer

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $150,731.68

Pay

Base: $58,369.52

Longevity: $6,115.36

Overtime: $61,938.32

Detail: $3,847.12

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,219.42

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#28 Adam Chuman

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $151,066.51

Pay

Base: $58,490.27

Longevity: $0.00

Overtime: $61,915.02

Detail: $7,149.18

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $7,422.98

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#27 Michael E. Correia

Department: Police

Position: Police Captain

Total Compensation: $151,421.89

Pay

Base: $81,206.12

Longevity: $8,538.4

Overtime: $36,811.50

Detail: $1,264.85

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $11,083.47

Dental: $1,299.48

Pension: $11,218.06

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#26 Stephany Blackwell

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Rescue Technician

Total Compensation: $154,001.24

Pay

Base: $61,045

Longevity: $4,086.68

Overtime: $64,492.87

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,287.63

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#25 David J. Duggan

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $154,416.91

Pay

Base: $59,196.60

Longevity: $5,559.42

Overtime: $55,445.58

Detail: $9,910.95

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,215.30

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#24 Joseph R. Desmarais

Department: Fire

Position: Deputy Assistant Fire Chief

Total Compensation: $154,544.52

Pay

Base: $91,623.12

Longevity: $9,079.63

Overtime: $27,402.94

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $12,604.49

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#23 William R. Kenyon

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Battalion Chief

Total Compensation: $154,611.78

Pay

Base: $83,959.36

Longevity: $7,290.02

Overtime: $35,718.41

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $11,554.93

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#22 Bryan D. Hawkins

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Rescue Captain

Total Compensation: $155,608.63

Pay

Base: $69,542.14

Longevity: $6,601.81

Overtime: $41,215.01

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $27,303.36

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $9,646.56

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#21 Steven Pare

Department: Administration

Position: Public Safety Commmissioner

Total Compensation: $156,147.90

Pay

Base: $149,423.83

Longevity: $0.00

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: N/A

Dental: N/A

Pension: $6,724.07

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#20 Eric E. Fallon

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $156,404.55

Pay

Base: $55,236.24

Longevity: $5,829.36

Overtime: $63,076.02

Detail: $8,430.13

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $7,743.74

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#19 Brian R. Chin

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $157,360.51

Pay

Base: $58,983.30

Longevity: $0.00

Overtime: $84,865.12

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $5,618.60

Dental: $421.46

Pension: $7,472.03

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#18 Carl H. Richards

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $157,878.05

Pay

Base: $57,446.04

Longevity: $6,115.36

Overtime: $64,351.37

Detail: $5,808.93

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,067.295

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#17 Fausto G. Garcia

Department: Police

Position: Police Officer

Total Compensation: $158,048.96

Pay

Base: $57,220.64

Longevity: $5,477.53

Overtime: $4,296.80

Detail: $70,833.77

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $11,083.47

Dental: $1,299.48

Pension: $7,837.27

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#16 Thomas L. Cassin

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Captain

Total Compensation: $158,104.17

Pay

Base: $68,755.40

Longevity: $7,305.32

Overtime: $56,308.60

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $9,645.80

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Photo: Flick/401(K)2013

Prev Next

#15 Thomas F. Oates, III

Department: Police

Position: Deputy Police Chief

Total Compensation: $158,736.47

Pay

Base: $116,423.81

Longevity: $12,378.08

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $16,100.24

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#14 Michael L. Pearis

Department: Finance Administration

Position: Director of Finance

Total Compensation: $159,370.71

Pay

Base: $139,192.37

Longevity: $0.00

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1,380.08

Pension: $6,263.66

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#13 Peter A. Tagliaferri

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Rescue Lieutenant

Total Compensation: $159,656.86

Pay

Base: $63,350.24

Longevity: $4,877.01

Overtime: $66,683.79

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,656.76

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#12 Michael A. Legault

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $159,740.28

Pay

Base: $57,446.04

Longevity: $6,115.36

Overtime: $72,016.89

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,072.93

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#11 Gregory D. Paolo

Department: Police

Position: Police Sergeant

Total Compensation: $160,715.32

Pay

Base: $70,277.64

Longevity: $6,818.24

Overtime: $30,025.64

Detail: $31,573.87

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $11,083.47

Dental: $1,299.48

Pension: $9,636.985

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#10 Andre' M. Ferro

Department: Fire

Position: Firefighter

Total Compensation: $162,109.81

Pay

Base: $58,333.41

Longevity: $6,251.76

Overtime: $61,589.16

Detail: $11,668.47

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1299.74

Pension: $8,177.95

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#9 James P. Mirza

Department: Fire

Position: Deputy Assistant Fire Chief

Total Compensation: $164,737.13

Pay

Base: $91,623.12

Longevity: $9,722.85

Overtime: $36,888.57

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1299.74

Pension: $12,668.24

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Photo: Flickr/Tax Credits

Prev Next

#8 J. J. Varone

Department: Fire

Position: Acting Fire Battalion Chief

Total Compensation: $165,600.53

Pay

Base: $84,914.32

Longevity: $7,290.02

Overtime: $45,628.29

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1299.74

Pension: $11,678.85

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#7 James S. Bennett

Department: Planning & Development

Position: Director of Economic Development

Total Compensation: $170,061.83

Pay

Base: $149,423.11

Longevity: $0.00

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1,380.08

Pension: $6,724.04

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#6 Zachariah Kenyon

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Rescue Lieutenant

Total Compensation: $172,514.51

Pay

Base: $63,589.71

Longevity: $4,877.01

Overtime: $79,272.01

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $8,686.72

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Photo: Flickr/401(K) 2013

Prev Next

#5 Boyce Spinelli

Department: Water Supply Board

Position: General Manager, WSB

Total Compensation: $177,418.15

Pay

Base: $150,392.56

Longevity: $9,299.47

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $9,159.90

Dental: $1,380.08

Pension: $7,186.14

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

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#4 Hugh T. Clements, Jr.

Department: Police

Position: Police Chief

Total Compensation: $180,872.02

Pay

Base: $134,397.90

Longevity: $14,080.04

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $18,559.74

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#3 Luis F. Sanlucas

Department: Police

Position: Police Lieutenant

Total Compensation: $190,234.68

Pay

Base: $77,210.61

Longevity: $8,148.40

Overtime: $9,003.18

Detail: $72,819.67

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $11,083.47

Dental: $1,299.48

Pension: $10,669.88

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#2 Michael D'Amico

Department: Mayor Staff

Position: Director of Administration

Total Compensation: $196,086.60

Pay

Base: $174,327.20

Longevity: $0.00

Overtime: $0.00

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $12,534.60

Dental: $1,380.08

Pension: $7,844.724

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

Prev Next

#1 Vincent J. D'Ambra

Department: Fire

Position: Fire Rescue Captain

Total Compensation: $218,145.27

Pay

Base: $68,762.44

Longevity: $7,290.03

Overtime: $116,356.94

Detail: $0.00

Benefits (City Contributions)

Medical: $14,789.32

Dental: $1,299.74

Pension: $9,646.80

Note on Detail Pay: Details are normally funded by the private parties that require it. But some detail pay is funded directly by the city. Payroll data provided by the city Law Department does not distinguish between the two.

 
 

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Comments:

Damico just got a raise July 1st, now makes $180,000!

Comment #1 by anthony sionni on 2013 12 09

It gets worse, working Rhode Islanders.

Your cost burden is going to go up even more if the Obamacare employer mandate kicks in after a year delay (to help Democrats through the 2014 elections). Employers, faced with the increased insurance costs to comply with Obamacare, will dump workers onto the exchanges to fend for themselves. Then you'll be forced to pay even higher insurance costs for you and your family.

All while the government class feasts on your taxes, collecting juicy salaries and pensions, and giving themselves raises.

Are you still going to keep voting for the RI Democrat Machine?

Comment #2 by Art West on 2013 12 09

still looking for the salaries of regular city workers. not fireman, police or teachers.

the pays of clerks and middle managers, etc as well as the number of them is pretty high. when you compare them with their qualifications.

wonder how they rank with the private sector.

Comment #3 by john paycheck on 2013 12 09

The city controls overtime period. They let the T.O. drop to a level as to where it is cheaper to pay overtime then to hire a new firefighter. The pay and benefits of a new hire is the tipping point for the city. The highest paid rescue captain, had to work two thousand five hundred extra hours. I don't think that is safe, but it is not his fault. I ask any of you are you willing to be away from your family for those plus his regular hours? There are many that take no overtime unless ordered to do so. If they all took overtime, this would be a non story. By the way, the fire union would rather they hire new firefighters, so pension and dues gets paid. Over time does not count in the pension.


T.O. = Table of organization.

Comment #4 by Stephen DeNinno on 2013 12 09

You won't know if the overtime is excessive until you do the math. Would it be cheaper to continue with overtime or hire new employees? Health care, vacation, and pension costs are key. The article alludes to it but Mr. DeNinno seems to delve deeper into the details. I would appreciate a budgetary analysis showing the savings/loss of each approach.

From the article: "The question remains, however, is what that will do to the city's benefits budget. In the short term, the new hires will relieve some pressure on the pension system thanks to their contributions, and that's a good thing. But the city will have to pay these workers health care costs and, eventually, their pensions."

Comment #5 by Rich B on 2013 12 09

Rich, It's a no win situation. The city lets the manpower drop. Then when the OT is exessive, they just simply blame the firefighters. When I was working, as long as manpower was up, OT was way down. I can remember getting 3 shifts of overtime in a whole year. How do you fight articles like this? Next they will be calling for doing away with minimum manning. This is a safety issue period. Rural Metro, a bankrupt private fire and rescue service, just closes down companies when vacation or lower manpower. This is why they are falling out of favor with cities everywhere. When you privatize, this is what you get. As for private ambulance service? They are going out of business left and right, all over the country. This is due to medicare and medicade cuts. (Thanks Obama care). They are unreliable and are profit driven. No disrespect to the EMTs. Just can't make it work with the reimbursments.

Comment #6 by Stephen DeNinno on 2013 12 09

greedy, looting unions have it coming to them that's for sure.
disgusting people they are

Comment #7 by Odd Job on 2013 12 09

This article only tells half the story, as evidenced by one of the concluding paragraphs:

"If you think this particular story isn't important to you because you don't live in the capital city, think again. What makes this story so important for all Rhode Islanders is the fact that Providence is almost half-funded by state aid. So when the average Rhode Islander from Westerly to Woonsocket is paying his income and sales taxes--he's paying these salaries."

The other half of the story would tell us not just who the "trough-feeders" are, but where they live. Are they Providence residents, or are they "miners" and "carpetbaggers" who live in more affluent suburban communities of the state?

Comment #8 by Breakfast of Champions on 2013 12 10

Go local , has underestimated the benefit costs in Providence and the overall costs of employment.In my proprietary study there are several towns on the verge of Chapter 9. No question that Providence troubles will exacerbate the poor condition of the vulnerable cities around the state.

Comment #9 by michael riley on 2013 12 10

Whoring out to the city unions in return for votes is a popular pastime for mayors. The con who would be mayor (again) Cianci, is the master of it.
Pay raise one year, more goodies in the pension bag the next. If you can dump the whole underfunded MESS on the STATE, so much the better.
The number of "dedicated" public safety "workers" leaving town in city vehicles every night to their real homes in Narraganset and elsewhere is a running joke. Dozens registered to vote in the city from one run down apartment address.
The present mayor, apparently, hears a state wide calling. His union sell outs ain't gonna help him there.

Comment #10 by G Godot on 2013 12 11

The car dealer bills out the mechanics @ $90.00 an hour. That's to fix a car when they get to it. Do you complain getting your car fixed? How much are doctors charging? They don't come to the car accident or your house they let those other people do that. I'm not complaining about either profession I think they should be compensated for their knowledge and work.
Yet you complain about people that come to where you are on the road, at a store at your home or anywhere there is an emergency with equipment and training to deal with the situation.
Hazardous materials, fires buildings cars or anything else, medical emergencies from injuries to heart attacks, would any of you do anything if someone dropped in front of you at the supermarket?
Do you stop at car accidents and assist? How about a robbery while you're in the convenience store? Did you stop for the drunk laying on the side of the road to see if he was breathing? Do you call if there is a dog loose in the neighborhood? Would you even know what to do other than call the people you complain about?
So have you taken the test to become the millionaire police or firefighter yet? Come on it's a million dollar job, how about it Mr. Moore? Be sure to let us know when you sign up.

How about those teachers? I used to pay my babysitter $10.00 an hour to watch my 2 kids. Does that sound unreasonable to anyone? I would hope not. So let's do a little math 15 kids x $5 an hour x 6 hours a day x 180 days = $81,000. That's where we start the babysitter, without a teaching degree or even a high school diploma.

By the way I do think there is something very wrong with the public school system, fire/emergency and police spending, I just think it's the administration and bureaucracy at the top and not the people doing the job. I don't think calling them names does any good either.

Comment #11 by Wuggly Ump on 2013 12 13




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