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NEW: Solomon Receives Endorsement from Councilman Luis Aponte

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

 

Providence Ward 10 City Councilman Luis Aponte Wednesday endorsed City Council President Michael Solomon for Mayor of Providence.

“I am supporting Michael Solomon for Mayor because we need a Mayor who will invest in our neighborhoods as well as ensure a balanced budget. The next Mayor needs to focus on rebuilding our city's middle class by creating jobs, rebuilding our schools and developing affordable housing,” said Councilman Aponte. “I am confident that Michael will do just that. I am impressed by his vision to invest $250 million over 10 years to rebuild our city schools and create 2,000 good jobs in the process. We need this kind of big vision to move our capital city forward."

Aponte has represented South Providence and Washington Park since being the first Latino elected to the City Council in 1998. He is the chair of the Providence Commission for Housing and Community Development and is the vice-chair of the Ways and Means Committee.

“I am grateful for Councilman Aponte's support,” said Solomon. “He broke the glass ceiling for Latinos on the City Council and has been a strong advocate on a range of issues impacting Providence's middle class from workers' rights to immigrant rights to the development of safe and affordable housing in the community. I know that by working together, we can strengthen our neighborhoods and grow our city's economy.”

Councilman Aponte joins several Providence elected officials who have endorsed Michael Solomon for Mayor:

  • Joe Almeida, State Representative District 12
  • Luis Aponte, City Councilman Ward 10
  • John Carnevale, State Representative District 13
  • Michael Correia, City Councilman Ward 6
  • John DeSimone, State Representative District 5
  • Grace Diaz, State Representative District 11
  • Maryellen Goodwin, Providence Democratic City Committee Chairwoman and State Senate Majority Whip
  • Terrance Hassett, City Councilman Ward 12 & President Pro Tempore
  • Wilbur Jennings, City Councilman Ward 8
  • Sabina Matos, City Councilwoman Ward 15
  • Nicholas Narducci, City Councilman Ward 4 & Senior Deputy Majority Leader
  • Thomas Palangio, State Representative District 3
  • David Salvatore, City Councilman Ward 14
  • Scott Slater, State Representative District 10
  • Anastasia Williams, State Representative District 9
  • Seth Yurdin, City Councilman Ward 1 & Majority Leader
  • Sam Zurier, City Councilman Ward 2
 

Related Slideshow: Rhode Island’s Highest Paid Mayors and Managers

The Rhode Island Department of Revenue's Office of Local Government Assistance, for the past 23 years, has conducted an "annual salary survey" of municipal positions in the state.  

Below are the salaries reported for chief executives -- Mayors or Town Managers ranked by municipalities (with the position) in 2012, from lowest to highest.   According to the survey, the amount "does not include fringe benefit data."  

Positions appointed are indicated with an (A); positions elected are marked with an (E).  

Prev Next

#33 Central Falls

Chief Executive Pay: $26,000 (E)

Finance Director: $87,125
 
Planning Director: $66,625
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#32 Richmond

Chief Executive Pay: $51,500 (A)

Finance Director: $56,706
 
Planning Director: $50,218
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#31 West Greenwich

Chief Executive Pay: $60,866 (A)

Finance Director: N/A
 
Planning Director: $52,412
Prev Next

#30 Cumberland

Chief Executive Pay: $67,799 (E)

Finance Director: (Vacant -- PT)
 
Planning Director: $70,250
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#29 Warren

Chief Executive Pay: $70,000 (A)

Finance Director: $62,424
 
Planning Director: $52,020
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#28 North Smithfield

Chief Executive Pay: $71,289 (E)

Finance Director: $71,235
 
Planning Director: $58,394
Prev Next

#27 North Providence

Chief Executive Pay: $75,000 (E)

Finance Director: $52,000
 
Planning Director: $62,098
Prev Next

#26 Johnston

Chief Executive Pay: $75,000 (E)

Finance Director: $95,000
 
Planning Director: $69,746
Prev Next

#25 Lincoln

Chief Executive Pay: $78,677 (E)

Finance Director: $80,610
 
Planning Director: $67,709
Prev Next

#24 Woonsocket

Chief Executive Pay: $80,000 (E)

Finance Director: $90,000
 
Planning Director: $82,750
Prev Next

#23 Cranston

Chief Executive Pay: $80,765 (E)

Finance Director: $96,425
 
Planning Director: $75,247
Prev Next

#22 Bristol

Chief Executive Pay: $81,162 (E)

Finance Director: N/A
 
Planning Director: $78,438
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#21 Tiverton

Chief Executive Pay: $83,900 (A)

Finance Director: N/A
 
Planning Director: Vacant
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#20 Pawtucket

Chief Executive Pay: $84,253 (E)

Finance Director: $82,000
 
Planning Director: $72,269
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#19 Hopkinton

Chief Executive Pay: $89,000 (A)

Finance Director: $73,043
 
Planning Director: $51,816
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#18 Charlestown

Chief Executive Pay: $93,000 (A)

Finance Director: N/A
 
Planning Director: $67,546
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#17 New Shoreham

Chief Executive Pay: $95,146 (A)

Finance Director: $85,058
 
Planning Director: N/A
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#16 Warwick

Chief Executive Pay: $100,000 (E)

Finance Director: $118,249
 
Planning Director: $97,648
Prev Next

#15 Smithfield

Chief Executive Pay: $100,940 (A)

Finance Director: $77,250
 
Planning Director: $65,920
Prev Next

#14 Jamestown

Chief Executive Pay: $106,957 (A)

Finance Director: $82,426
 
Planning Director: $71,481
Prev Next

#13 Burrillville

Chief Executive Pay: $110,520 (A)

Finance Director: $80,000
 
Planning Director: $80,000
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#12 North Kingstown

Chief Executive Pay: $111,394 (A)

Finance Director: $82,442
 
Planning Director: $82,442
Prev Next

#11 Westerly

Chief Executive Pay: $117,305 (A)

Finance Director: $106,088
 
Planning Director: $76,812
Prev Next

#10 West Warwick

Chief Executive Pay: $120,000 (A)

Finance Director: $91,357
 
Planning Director: $69,000
Prev Next

#9 Coventry

Chief Executive Pay: $122,000 (A)

Finance Director: $97,150
 
Planning Director: $83,884
Prev Next

#8 Providence

Chief Executive Pay: $123,762 (E)

Finance Director: $140,000
 
Planning Director: $85,098
Prev Next

#7 East Providence

Chief Executive Pay: $125,000 (A)

Finance Director: $112,210
 
Planning Director: $97,350
Prev Next

#6 Portsmouth

Chief Executive Pay: $126,000 (A)

Finance Director: $95,819
 
Planning Director: $78,382
 
Prev Next

#5 East Greenwich

Chief Executive Pay: $131,005 (A)

Finance Director: $96,255
 
Planning Director: $77,835
Prev Next

#4 Newport

Chief Executive Pay: $135,000 (A)

Finance Director: $120,799
 
Planning Director: $100,531
Prev Next

#3 Barrington

Chief Executive Pay: $143,977 (A)

Finance Director: $106,194
 
Planning Director: $75,716
Prev Next

#2 Middletown

Chief Executive Pay: $147,350 (A)

Finance Director: $97,025
 
Planning Director: $89,436
Prev Next

#1 South Kingstown

Chief Executive: $153,853 (A)

Finance Director: $119,610
 
Planning Director: $93,181
 
 

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Comments:

And the comedy show continues!
These two guys have been at each others throats for the past 4 years.
$250M in school improvement spending? And just where will the money come from? Guess these two birds haven't been following the disastrous fiscal situation in the city. No surprise. They've both been councilors for many years and have little to no accomplishments to show for it. Good luck Providence residents.

Comment #1 by Walter Miller on 2014 03 19

Solomon voted to raise your property taxes several times, voted to increase your car taxes and water rates, if you call that a vision for providence, god help us!


Lets also remember he voted for the ward boundaries redistricting.

Comment #2 by anthony sionni on 2014 03 20

Remember this article from golocal in 2011

"Two veteran local lawmakers are citing political retribution as the reason they were completely left off Standing Committees for the first time in either of their careers. Providence City Councilmen Kevin Jackson (Ward 3) and Luis Aponte (Ward 10) say their lack of support for new President Michael Solomon (Ward 5) has put them in the dog house with council leadership and now it’s the residents of their respective neighborhoods who will pay the price."
“I can only attribute this to being about power and retribution,” Aponte said. “I ran for Council President and didn’t have the votes and now this is happening. To me, it’s all about power. I’ve been on Committees ever year. This isn’t normal at all.”

Comment #3 by anthony sionni on 2014 03 20

How about his PEDP LOAN

The Hummel Report has also found that the oldest loan on record - 24 years - was given to a business partly owned by Providence City Council President Michael Solomon, long before he became involved in politics. The Conrad on Westminster Street, received a $500,000 loan from the city in 1988 and $3.5 million in private financing to develop condos.
Hummel: ``What was the pitch in terms of an investment?''
Solomon: ``Condominium use, like any other pitch, it's a business deal. It didn't go the way we'd like it to go, but we stayed committed to it. And we're committed to seeing the project through.''
In fact, Solomon and his partners took out another $100,000 for a total of $600,000 - and still have a balance of $454,000 owed to the city. Solomon says they sold 20 units on the upper floors to pay off the $3.5 million in private financing; and last spring converted the unit they own on the ground floor into a restaurant - hoping to generate enough money to pay off the remainder of the loan over the next decade.
Solomon and his partners repeatedly went to the city asking for payment moratoriums and for the last two years have been paying interest only on the loan. This month they go back to paying down principal as well now that the restaurant is generating money.
Hummel: ``The fact is you are the council president, you have a loan with the city and this loan is going on 23 years now. And the fact is it's almost $450,000 of a $500,000 loan. So what about the person who says why isn't the city council president making good on the loan to the city?''

Solomon: " I'm pretty happy right now that we set out to do economic development and that's what succeeded doing.''

Comment #4 by anthony sionni on 2014 03 20

Do you think the FEDS are looking at his loan with the PEDP?

Comment #5 by anthony sionni on 2014 03 20

ALL FULL OF SHIT!

Comment #6 by EDDIE GURTIN on 2014 03 22




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