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NEW: Presidential Advisor Coming to URI for Black History Month

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

 

Charles J. Ogletree, a long-time mentor to President Obama, will be the featured speaker at the University of Rhode Island’s annual Black History Month lecture next month.

In a release issued today, the university said the nationally-recognized Harvard law professor will speak about the historic significance of Obama’s election and “whether the country has made any progress to end racial discrimination” since his election.

“America widely celebrated the election of Barack Obama as the first black president in November, 2008,’’ Ogletree said. “Five years later, it is important to address this historic moment and whether we are making progress in the effort to create a post-racial America.’’

Free and open to the public, the talk will start at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5 in the Memorial Union Ballroom.

Ogletree will also be signing copies of his latest book “The Presumption of Guilt:The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America," at the university.

 

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