“We Have to Shift Our Thinking” in Hurricane Disaster Recovery: UMass-Dartmouth’s McGuire

Saturday, September 15, 2018

 

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Chad McGuire

UMass-Dartmouth Professor of Public Policy Chad McGuire joined GoLocal News Editor Kate Nagle on LIVE to talk about what happens after Hurricane Florence hits -- and all natural disasters in general.

McGuire, who said his research focuses on what government does "before, during, and after these events" spoke to the implications to consider. 

"It'll be interesting to see the political response -- one of the most difficult things we have to overcome as a nation,-we culturally think of land as static, inert. We have to shift our thinking, from land that's static to active," said McGuire. 

"It will be interesting to see how the government chooses to respond. The political incentives are clear. When the government comes in and distributes money directly to people -- they win votes by doing that."

"Are they going to dole out a lot of after the fact benefits, and not think about what we talked about earlier? We've done a lot of things to incentivize people to live in risky areas. At the federal level, there are difficult choices about stopping to incentivize the building of infrastructure."

 

Related Slideshow: 10 Things to Know About Hurricane Florence - September 2018

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Florence Making Landfall 

According to the National Hurricane Center, the storm is expected to make landfall by Thursday morning and could be as strong as a Category 3 storm.

However, the center adds that there is a chance the storm reaches land by late Wednesday night. 

"The earliest reasonable time that tropical-storm-force winds could arrive in the United States from #Florence is late Wednesday, and the most likely time is Thursday morning. Wednesday should be the last full day to prepare, so plan accordingly," said the Hurricane Center. 

 

PHOTO: National Hurricane Center 

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58 MPH Winds Possible 

Hurricane Florence could bring winds up to 58 miles per hour to the Carolinas and Virginia. 

"Florence is likely to cause damaging hurricane-force winds along parts of the coasts of South & North Carolina, & a Hurricane Watch is in effect for some of this area. Damaging winds could also spread well inland into portions of the Carolinas & Virginia," said the National Hurricane Center. 

 

PHOTO: National Hurricane Center 

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Evacuations Under Way 

Evacuation has already started in the Carolinas with Hurricane Florence about to hit. 

According to the Washington Post, more than 1.5 million people have been ordered to evacuate the coastal areas ahead of the storm.

“Even if you’ve ridden out storms before, this one is different,” said North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper during a press conference on Tuesday. 

In order to speed up the process, the lanes of the highways have been reversed in order for everyone to be able to get out. 

North Carolina Emergency Management adds that prisons are evacuating staff and offenders to other state facilities due to Hurricane Florence.

Offenders will be given a free call to families this weekend.

 

PHOTO: Ross Arnette/twitter

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NOAA Plane Flies Through Florence 

A plane from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration flew through the eye of the storm. 

via GIPHY

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Rainfall Potential from Hurricane Florence 

According to the National Hurricane Center, some parts of the Carolina's could see up to 20 inches of rain. 

According to the chart, most of the area will see at least six to ten inches of rain. 

The Center notes that the forecast is valid until Tuesday, September 18 at 8 p.m. 

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Flash Flood Potential 

The National Hurricane Center chart shows that the majority of the area has a marginal to slight chance for flash flooding. 

However, areas right along the coast have a moderate to high percent chance of flooding. 

The forecast is valid through Friday, September 14. 

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President Trump Addresses Florence 

President Donald Trump addressed Hurricane Florence in a press conference from the Oval Office on Tuesday, September 11. 

"They haven't seen anything like what's coming at us in 25, 30 years, maybe ever. It's tremendously big and tremendously wet," said Trump. 

Trump went on to advise everyone to get out of Florence's path. 

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Biggest Storm Ever North of Florida 

Hurricane Florence could be the biggest hurricane ever to hit north of Florida, according to Business Insider. 

The biggest hurricane to previously hit South Carolina was Hurricane Hugo in 1989.

That hurricane brought 130 mph winds. 

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Hurricane Florence 

Here is a scientific look at Hurricane Florence as it approaches the Carolinas. 

via GIPHY

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More Storms Coming 

While Florence is the primary focus along the east coast, there are more storms potentially on the way. 

A chart from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows that Hurricane Isaac and Hurricane Helene are out at sea.

While still a little ways away, Isaac is currently carrying 70 mph winds and is moving west. 

Helen is carrying 110 mph winds and is moving northwest. 

 

PHOTO: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 

 
 

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