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Trender: Monologue Master Kevin Broccoli

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

 

Who are the Rhode Islanders leading in arts, fashion, food, and style? They're Trenders, and GoLocalProv offers glimpses of the people you most want to know on the scene. Today, Kevin Broccoli, actor and creator of 1,473 monologues (at last count). This is him, not a character, talking.

Homegrown factor: Born in and lived most of his life in Johnston. Went to LaSalle Academy.

Age: 26

1. Where did you get your start in your field?

I started doing theater when I was in third grade. I played Mr. Owl in Bambi. The reviews were mixed, but I was hooked. Three years ago I did my first monologue show in a loft space with about six people onstage and two people in the audience. The reviews were slightly better than they were for Mr. Owl, and once again, I was hooked.

2. How has living in Rhode Island played a role in your work?

It's given me the opportunity to pull from a huge pool of talent. I've also been able to take a lot of chances, artistically speaking, and know that I have a wonderful community to support me.

3. You are Rhode Island's most prolific monologue creator. What drives you to create all these characters?

What drives me is the fact that I have a lot to say.  I find that if you're loud and opinionated and you speak as yourself, it can turn people off. Put those words behind a character and you're a writer.  Works for me.

4. What's next for you?

I'm going to be performing at 2nd Story Theatre in Warren in The Good Doctor through April 10th. There will be a monologue show at Catch a Rising Star at Twin River in Lincoln. I'll also be acting in The Maderati by Richard Greenberg at the Artists Exchange in Cranston April 28th - May 7th.  It's being produced by this amazing new group called the Burbage Theatre Company and directed by my friend Alex Duckworth.

5. What's the biggest challenge about working in Rhode Island? The greatest reward?

The biggest challenge is having to defend why I stay in Rhode Island rather than move to New York so I can wait tables at TGIFridays and get rejected six times a week for shows like Super Mario Brothers: The Musical. I think we need to have a little more pride in our arts community here.  The reward is being given so many opportunities to work with such great people over and over again.

 

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