Welcome! Login | Register
 

FM Global Pledges $1 million to URI’s Proposed Engineering Facility—FM Global has pledged $1 million to support…

Brian Bishop: A Turning Point in RI: Will Voters Approve a Constitutional Convention?—It is OSTPA’s contention that the decision to…

Mark McKenney: Providence Community Library is Too Important To Underfund—This summer, Providence Community Library celebrated its fifth…

RI’s Potenza Named Italian Master Chef—Local Chef Walter Potenza was recently named one…

Providence Symposium to Present “Not Always Easy: Building the New Urban Experience”—The Providence Preservation Society’s yearlong speaker series will…

7 Reasons To Be Excited About The Celtics Season—Celtics season tips off tonight

Elorza Unveils Economic Plan—Democratic candidate for Mayor Jorge Elorza has unveiled…

URI Rams Men’s Soccer Back in National Rankings—Rhody Rams Mens Soccer back in National Rankings

It’s All About Education: What if College Isn’t Necessary—What if College Isn't Necessary?

The Scoop: Profughi Questions Brown Poll, Hodgson Releases NRA Survey, and More—Welcome back to The Scoop, the 4 p.m.…

 
 

slides: James Clayton Sattel’s RI Views: Estuaries + Coves

Saturday, November 24, 2012

 

Photographer James Clayton Sattel is passionate about Rhode Island, particularly those shores, crags, and vistas of his home island: Aquidneck.

This week, Jim explores Rhode Island's shorelines to photograph its marshes and coves, full of late fall and early winter colors. "The days grow short, the brown leaves drop off the trees, the period of morning and afternoon low-angled shadows last most of the day," he says.

Further, the days tend to begin with clear and calm weather: "so calm there are no waves to photograph. Because there is less camouflage, the wildlife pop with more expression." Shore birds, for example, he says, make their last hurrah's before heading south.

"Simply said, all of the above conditions can provide excellent lighting, with great contrast, and golds and reds that pop, texture of water (smooth as glass). The less attractive brown and rust yellow leaves have fallen off the trees, leaving clear exposure to the stronger reds and maples, chestnuts, oaks, and the greenery of pine. What is surprising to me, these conditions fall into place mid-November...thus creating briliant fall colours later than our Northern, and eastward New England cousins!"

To see more of or purchase Sattel's distinctive views, go here.

 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.