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URI School of Oceanography to Hold Climate Change Lecture June 2-6

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

 

Andrew Freedman, climate change reporter

The University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography’s Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting will host its Annual Public Lecture Series, Scientists and Journalists: Getting the Point Across on June 2 through June 6, at the URI Narragansett Bay Campus

The 2014 Metcalf Institute Lecture Series will bring leading journalists, scientists, and policy experts to URI to explore the latest scientific research and actions being taken to address climate change.

The lectures, which are free and open to the public, will be held at the Coastal Institute Auditorium on the URI Narragansett Bay Campus, 218 South Ferry Road in Narragansett.

Monday, June 2, 3:30 p.m.

Covering Climate Change in the Digital Age – Ranked the most prolific climate reporter in the U.S. in 2012, Andrew Freedman covers climate change for Mashable.com, “one of the most engaged digital networks in the world.” Freedman will discuss the challenges of accurately covering extreme weather events in the context of climate change and the opportunities this beat offers for journalistic innovation.

Tuesday, June 3, 3:30 p.m.

The Ocean Acidification Challenge: A pH Balancing Act – Gretchen Hofmann, of the University of California at Santa Barbara, will discuss the latest research on ocean acidification and the potential for marine organisms to adapt to a dramatically altered environment, now and in the future.

Wednesday, June 4, 3:30 p.m.

Building Resilience: How Coastal Communities Can Roll With the Punches – Margaret Davidson, NOAA Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, will describe state and regional efforts to adapt to climate change on U.S. coasts, with a focus on new strategies for building healthy and resilient coastal communities.

Thursday, June 5, 3:30 p.m.

Using Big Data to Understand Earth’s Future – Unprecedented rates of current climate change will force species to either adapt, move, or become extinct, in turn affecting everything from food supply to jobs. Camilo Mora, University of Hawaii, will discuss recent global-scale research to project where and how soon we might see these changes.

Friday, June 6, 11 a.m.

Managing Risk for an Uncertain Future – Howard Kunreuther, University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, will discuss the challenges and uncertainties facing residents, businesses, and government in responding to climate change projections, focusing on the roles of mitigation, adaptation, and insurance in managing catastrophic risks.

The lecture series will coincide with Metcalf Institute’s 16th Annual Science Immersion Workshop for Journalists, a fellowship focusing on climate change reporting.

The Metcalf Fellows, selected from a highly competitive pool of applicants, represent a variety of media organizations ranging from the Los Angeles Times, Israel’s Haaretz, and CQ Roll Call to ecoRI News, an online environmental news outlet, and KCTS, a public TV television station in Seattle, Washington.

Public Invited to Gallery Night at Studio Blue

The URI Graduate School of Oceanography will host an exhibit in the Coastal Institute’s Studio Blue from June 5 to 7, featuring the marine art of Michael Coyne, Kate Huntington, and Dora Atwater Millikin, with sales benefitting the URI Graduate School of Oceanography. The public is invited to a reception with the artists at Studio Blue following the Metcalf Institute public lecture on Thursday, June 5, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. RSVP by May 29 at studiobluegallery@gmail.com or 401-874-6211 to attend the reception. The exhibit continues Friday, June 6, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday, June 7, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Get a sneak preview or join the virtual sale, May 26 – June 20, at gso.uri.edu/gallery.

About Metcalf Institute

Metcalf Institute is an internationally recognized leader in providing environmental science training for journalists. The Institute also offers communication workshops for scientists, science resources for journalists and free public lectures on environmental topics. Metcalf Institute was established at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography in 1997 with funding from three media foundations: the Belo Corporation, the Providence Journal Charitable Foundation and the Philip L. Graham Fund, with additional support from the Telaka Foundation. Metcalf programming is underwritten by federal and foundation grants, as well as private donations managed by the University of Rhode Island Foundation.

About Studio Blue

Studio Blue, a gallery showcasing the intersection and interaction of science and art, is a collaboration between student and faculty artists from the University of Rhode Island Art department and the Rhode Island School of Design with scientists from the URI Graduate School of Oceanography and the URI College of the Environment and Life Sciences. The collection will expand every year as new artists contribute to an eclectic conversation between art and science. Studio Blue also periodically hosts special exhibitions showcasing marine and environmental art. Located in the Coastal Institute at the Narragansett Bay Campus, Studio Blue is open to the public. Studio Blue is supported and administered by URI GSO, Office of Marine Programs, the Coastal Institute, and the Rhode Island National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research.

 

Related Slideshow: RI Fishing Industry’s Decline by the Numbers

The Rhode Island commercial fishing industry is in trouble. A study conducted in 2011 by Cornell University offered a portrait of an industry in crisis, with declines in sales, fishing vessels, and many types of permits. That study also showed how important the preservation of the fishing industry is to the state economy. Below are key figures on the decline and current state of the fishing industry in Rhode Island excerpted from the study. Some data is also taken from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Sales from Catches

2006 to 2010 Change

Reduction: $38.1 million

Percent Change: 38.6%

 

2006 sales: $98.5 million

2010 sales: $60.4 million

 

Last year sales were below $60 million: 1982

1982 sales adjusted for inflation: $126 million

 

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickr/kamsky

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State-Licensed Boats

2005 to 2011 Change

Decline in # of Licensed Vessels: 190

Percent Change: -12.7%

 

Number of State-Licensed Vessels

2005: 1,488

2011: 1,298

 

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

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State Licenses Issued

Multi-purpose License

2006 to 2011 Change

Decline in # of Licenses: 150

Percent change: -14.7%

 

Number of State Licenses Issued By Year

2006: 1,017

2007: 973

2008: 939

2009: 917

2010: 887

2011: 867

 

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickt/Eric Molina

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Federally-Licensed Boats

Decline in # of Licensed Vessels: 8

Percent Change: -2.1%

 

Number of Federally-Licensed Boats

2005: 367

2010: 359

 

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickr/James Brooks

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Groundfishing Vessels '09

Point Judith Total: 32

Rhode Island Total: 60

Connecticut Total: 8

Massachusetts Total: 312

Northeast Total: 570

 

Note: Groundfish are those that dwell on the bottom of the sea. They include fish such as cod, halibut, haddock, and flounder. The Northeast includes the coastal New England states along with New York and New Jersey. Only those vessels that had revenue from at least one groundfish trip are counted.

Source: NOAA

Photo: Flickr/Liz West

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Groundfishing Vessels '11

Point Judith Total: 28

Rhode Island Total: 49

Connecticut Total: 5

Massachusetts Total: 224

Northeast Total: 420


Note: Groundfish are those that dwell on the bottom of the sea. They include fish such as cod, halibut, haddock, and flounder. The Northeast includes the coastal New England states along with New York and New Jersey. Only those vessels that had revenue from at least one groundfish trip are counted.

Source: NOAA

Photo: Flickr/bob19156

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Groundfishing Vessels % Decline

% Change 2009-20011

 

Point Judith: -12.5%

Rhode Island: -18.3%

Connecticut: -37.5%

Massachusetts: -28.2%

Northeast Total: -26.3%


Note: Groundfish are those that dwell on the bottom of the sea. They include fish such as cod, halibut, haddock, and flounder. The Northeast includes the coastal New England states along with New York and New Jersey. Only those vessels that had revenue from at least one groundfish trip are counted.

Source: GoLocalProv analysis of NOAA data.

Photo: Flick/NickSarebi

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Groundfishing Value

Change 2007 to 2010: -$7.8 million

Percent Change 2007 to 2010: -22.4%

 

Values by Year

2007: $34.7 million

2008: $30.8 million

2009: $23.5 million

2010: $26.9 million

 

Note: Above data is for groundfishing by permitted vessels which are home-ported in Rhode Island. Annual data corresponds to the fishing year, which is from May 1 of one calendar year to April 30 of the next.

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickr/BrianPocius

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Groundfishing Jobs

Change 2007 to 2010: -48

Percent Change 2007 to 2010: -15.9%

 

Number of Crew Positions by Year

2007: 301

2008: 278

2009: 268

2010: 253

 

Note: Data above are the totals for the Rhode Island home-ported vessels engaged in groundfishing. Annual data corresponds to the fishing year, which is from May 1 of one calendar year to April 30 of the next.

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickr/Ted Kerwin

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Groundfishing Trips

Change 2007 to 2010: -3,492

Percent Change 2007 to 2010: -21.3%

 

Number of Crew Positions by Year

2007: 16,353

2008: 14,515

2009: 13,676

2010: 12,861

 

Note: Crew trips provide an indicator of changes in earnings, as crew members are typically paid per trip. A decline in trips corresponds to a decline in opportunities to share in trip earnings. Data above are the totals for the Rhode Island home-ported vessels engaged in groundfishing. Annual data corresponds to the fishing year, which is from May 1 of one calendar year to April 30 of the next.

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickr/Mike Baird

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Fish Sales: Economic Value

Total Contribution in 2010

Sales: $150.3 million

Income: $106.3 million

Jobs: 4,968

 

Economic Areas Benefitting

Harvesting

Primary Dealers/Processors

Restaurants

Grocers

 

Note: Data shows the economic contributions of sales from catches that are sold in Rhode Island to the state economy. Complete data over a period of time was not available from the sources used. The data is meant simply to show the importance of the fishing industry to the overall economy.

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickr/vv@ldzen

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Fish Sales: Value to Restaurants

Economic Contributions in 2010

Sales: $8.7 million

Income: $5.2 million

Jobs: 2,811

 

Note: Data shows the economic contributions of sales from catches that are sold in Rhode Island to the state economy. The specific contribution made to the restaurant industry is shown above. Complete data over a period of time was not available from the sources used. The data is meant simply to show the importance of the fishing industry to the overall economy.

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Photo: Flickr/A. Davey

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Commercial Fishing: Total Economic Value

Comprehensive Estimate of Commercial Fishing’s Total Contribution to RI Economy in 2010

Sales: $763.3 million

Income: $239.9 million

Jobs: 8,995

 

Note: Data shows the total contribution the commercial fishing industry makes to the Rhode Island economy. Complete data over a period of time was not available from the sources used. The data is meant simply to show the importance of the fishing industry to the overall economy.

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

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Commercial Fishing: Value to Restaurants

Comprehensive Estimate of Commercial Fishing’s Total Contribution to the Restaurant Industry in 2010

Sales: $34.9 million

Income: $57.6 million

Jobs: 2,811

 

Note: Data shows the total contribution the commercial fishing industry makes to the Rhode Island economy. Above, the specific contribution the commercial fishing industry makes to the restaurant industry is shown. Complete data over a period of time was not available from the sources used. The data is meant simply to show the importance of the fishing industry to the overall economy.

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

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RI Seafood Industry Job Decline

Seafood Commercial Establishments and Employees

Change from 2005 to 2008

Change in # Establishments: -6

Change in # Employees: -63

 

Changes in Jobs by Year

2005: 714

2006: 646

2007: 602

2008: 651

 

Source: Cornell University Cooperative Extension Marine Program

 
 

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